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Wind Plasma and Radio Waves (WAVES) Time Domain Sampler (TDS) Dust Impact, Level 3, 1 s Data

ResourceID
spase://NASA/NumericalData/Wind/WAVES/DustImpact/PT1S

Description

Wind WAVES Time Domain Sampler, TDS, Dust Data File References: 1) Bougeret, J.-L., et al., WAVES: The Radio and Plasma Wave Investigation on the Wind Spacecraft, Space Sci. Rev., 71, 231-263, 1995, doi:10.1007/BF00751331. 2) Malaspina, D.M., M. Horanyi, A. Zaslavsky, K. Goetz, L.B. Wilson III, and K. Kersten, Interplanetary and Interstellar Dust observed by the Wind/WAVES Electric Field Instrument, Geophys. Res. Lett., 41, 266-272, 2014, doi:10.1002/2013GL058786. 3) Malaspina, D.M., and L.B. Wilson III, A Database of Interplanetary and Interstellar Dust Detected by the Wind Spacecraft, J. Geophys. Res., 121, 9369–9377, 2016, doi:10.1002/2016JA023209.

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Details

Version:2.2.9

NumericalData

ResourceID
spase://NASA/NumericalData/Wind/WAVES/DustImpact/PT1S
ResourceHeader
ResourceName
Wind Plasma and Radio Waves (WAVES) Time Domain Sampler (TDS) Dust Impact, Level 3, 1 s Data
ReleaseDate
2020-07-07 21:16:06Z
Description

Wind WAVES Time Domain Sampler, TDS, Dust Data File References: 1) Bougeret, J.-L., et al., WAVES: The Radio and Plasma Wave Investigation on the Wind Spacecraft, Space Sci. Rev., 71, 231-263, 1995, doi:10.1007/BF00751331. 2) Malaspina, D.M., M. Horanyi, A. Zaslavsky, K. Goetz, L.B. Wilson III, and K. Kersten, Interplanetary and Interstellar Dust observed by the Wind/WAVES Electric Field Instrument, Geophys. Res. Lett., 41, 266-272, 2014, doi:10.1002/2013GL058786. 3) Malaspina, D.M., and L.B. Wilson III, A Database of Interplanetary and Interstellar Dust Detected by the Wind Spacecraft, J. Geophys. Res., 121, 9369–9377, 2016, doi:10.1002/2016JA023209.

Acknowledgement
D.M. Malaspina, L.B. Wilson III, R.J. MacDowall, We would like to thank the Wind/WAVES team, especially Keith Goetz, Paul J. Kellogg, Kris Kersten, and Josh Lynch for their Support with Data Retrieval and Calibration. Please Cite or Reference the Wind WAVES Paper by J.-L. Bougeret et al., 1995 in Space Sci. Rev. and Work by D.M. Malaspina et al., 2014 in Geophys. Res. Lett., doi:10.1002/2013GL058786. We would also appreciate a Reference to the Wind Dust Impact Database Paper: D.M. Malaspina et al., 2016, in J. Geophys. Res., doi:10.1002/2016JA023209.
Contacts
RolePerson
1.PrincipalInvestigatorspase://SMWG/Person/David.M.Malaspina
2.PrincipalInvestigatorspase://SMWG/Person/Lynn.B.Wilson.III
3.PrincipalInvestigatorspase://SMWG/Person/Robert.J.MacDowall
4.MetadataContactspase://SMWG/Person/Robert.E.McGuire
5.MetadataContactspase://SMWG/Person/Lee.Frost.Bargatze
InformationURL
Name
The Wind Dust Database
URL
https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/2016JA023209
Description

The Wind Database of Interplanetary and Interstellar Dust Events, JGR Article

PriorIDs
spase://VSPO/NumericalData/Wind/WAVES/DustImpact/PT1S
AccessInformation
RepositoryID
spase://SMWG/Repository/NASA/GSFC/SPDF
Availability
Online
AccessRights
Open
AccessURL
Name
FTPS from SPDF (not with most browsers)
URL
ftps://spdf.gsfc.nasa.gov/pub/data/wind/waves/dust_impact_l3/
Description

Access to Data in CDF Format via ftp from SPDF

AccessURL
Name
HTTPS from SPDF
URL
https://spdf.gsfc.nasa.gov/pub/data/wind/waves/dust_impact_l3/
Description

Access to Data in CDF Format via http from SPDF

AccessURL
Name
CDAWeb
URL
https://cdaweb.sci.gsfc.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/eval2.cgi?dataset=WI_L3-DUSTIMPACT_WAVES&index=sp_phys
ProductKey
WI_L3-DUSTIMPACT_WAVES
Description

Access to ASCII, CDF, and plots via NASA/GSFC CDAWeb

Format
CDF
Encoding
None
Acknowledgement
D.M. Malaspina, L.B. Wilson III, R.J. MacDowall, We would like to thank the Wind/WAVES team, especially Keith Goetz, Paul J. Kellogg, Kris Kersten, and Josh Lynch for their Support with Data Retrieval and Calibration. Please Cite or Reference the Wind WAVES Paper by J.-L. Bougeret et al., 1995 in Space Sci. Rev. and Work by D.M. Malaspina et al., 2014 in Geophys. Res. Lett., doi:10.1002/2013GL058786. We would also appreciate a Reference to the Wind Dust Impact Database Paper: D.M. Malaspina et al., 2016, in J. Geophys. Res., doi:10.1002/2016JA023209.. Please acknowledge the data providers and CDAWeb when using these data.
ProcessingLevel
Calibrated
InstrumentIDs
spase://SMWG/Instrument/Wind/WAVES
MeasurementType
ElectricField
TemporalDescription
TimeSpan
StartDate
1995-01-01 00:00:00.000
StopDate
2016-01-01 23:59:59.999
Cadence
PT1S
ObservedRegion
Heliosphere
ObservedRegion
Heliosphere.NearEarth
ObservedRegion
Heliosphere.Inner
Parameter #1
Name
Epoch, TT2000, Start of TDS Event
ParameterKey
EPOCH
Description

Epoch, Terrestrial Time 2000, TT2000, Start of Time Domain Sampler, TDS, Event

Caveats
Time at Beginning of TDS Event as measured by the Minor Frame Clock. Thus, the Time Stamps have not been adjusted to correct for the Inherent Positive Definite Rounding Errors due to the Low Resolution of the Minor Frame Clock Times. This will be implemented in Future Versions when the Entire TDS Dataset is released on CDAWeb.
Cadence
PT1S
Units
ns
UnitsConversion
1e-9>s
RenderingHints
AxisLabel
Epoch
ValueFormat
I22
ScaleType
LinearScale
ValidMin
1994-11-01T23:59:59.999999999
ValidMax
2044-11-01T23:59:59.999999999
FillValue
9999-12-31T23:59:59.999999999
Support
SupportQuantity
Temporal
Parameter #2
Name
TDS Event Number
Set
Time series defined by using: EPOCH
ParameterKey
TDS_Event_Number
Description

Time Domain Sampler, TDS, Event Number, Identifier for each Dust Impact

Caveats
The TDS Event Number is a Unique Long Integer that identifies one Event from another. The Counter rolls over, so the Date and Event Number are required for Waveform Identification.
Cadence
PT1S
RenderingHints
ValueFormat
I8
ValidMin
0
ValidMax
99999999
FillValue
-1
Support
SupportQuantity
Other
Parameter #3
Name
TDS Event Duration
Set
Time series defined by using: EPOCH
ParameterKey
TDS_Event_Duration
Description

Time Domain Sampler, TDS, Event Duration

Caveats
The Total Duration of each TDSF Event in Seconds. A single TDSF Event is defined as a Snapshot of two Electric Field Components with the same Event Number occurring on the Same Date. Most TDSF Events were sampled at 120000 Samples per Second, thus will have Durations of roughly 17 ms. However, the longest Duration Events can last upwards of about 1 s.
Cadence
PT1S
Units
s
RenderingHints
ValueFormat
E14.6
ValidMin
0.015
ValidMax
1.3
FillValue
-1.0e+31
Support
Qualifier
Scalar
SupportQuantity
Temporal
Parameter #4
Name
Spacecraft Spin Rate
Set
Time series defined by using: EPOCH
ParameterKey
Wind_Spin_Rate
Description

Spacecraft Spin Rate

Caveats
The Spacecraft, SC, Spin Rate in '/s was determined by using the known Event Duration and Angle subtended during each TDS Event. This Value is accurate to much less than 1', where the Uncertainties arise from the Onboard Sample Rate Clock of the TDS Receiver and Sun Pulse Detector Time Accuracy. The Spin Period in Seconds was then determined by using 360' divided by the Spin Rate Value. Both Values assume that the Spin Rate and Spin Period are constant during the TDS Event, which should be an accurate Assumption for nearly all Events.
Cadence
PT1S
Units
°/s
UnitsConversion
0.0174532925>rad/s
RenderingHints
DisplayType
TimeSeries
AxisLabel
Spin Rate
ValueFormat
E14.6
ScaleType
LinearScale
ValidMin
0.0
ValidMax
360.0
FillValue
-1.0e+31
Support
Qualifier
Scalar
SupportQuantity
Other
Parameter #5
Name
Spacecraft Spin Period
Set
Time series defined by using: EPOCH
ParameterKey
Wind_Spin_Period
Description

Spacecraft Spin Period

Caveats
The Spacecraft, SC, Spin Rate in '/s was determined by using the known Event Duration and Angle subtended during each TDS Event. This Value is accurate to much less than 1', where the Uncertainties arise from the Onboard Sample Rate Clock of the TDS Receiver and Sun Pulse Detector Time Accuracy. The Spin Period in Seconds was then determined by using 360' divided by the Spin Rate Value. Both Values assume that the Spin Rate and Spin Period are constant during the TDS Event, which should be an accurate Assumption for nearly all Events.
Cadence
PT1S
Units
s
RenderingHints
DisplayType
TimeSeries
AxisLabel
Spin Period
ValueFormat
E14.6
ScaleType
LinearScale
ValidMin
0.0
ValidMax
5.0
FillValue
-1.0e+31
Support
Qualifier
Scalar
SupportQuantity
Temporal
Parameter #6
Name
Peak Amplitude, Channel 1
Set
Time series defined by using: EPOCH
ParameterKey
Ch01___Peak_amplitude
Description

Peak Amplitude, Channel 1

Caveats
The Peak Amplitude of the Electric Field Component from the Dust Impact. This is the Peak Amplitude measured during a TDSF Event on both Antenna. This is a Signed Value, that is, Plus, +, or Minus, -. The X-Antenna was first cut on August 3, 2000. It was cut again on September 24, 2002. Currently, the effective Antenna Lengths used are 41.1 m, 3.79 m, and 2.17 m for the X-Antenna, Y-Antenna, and Z-Antenna, respectively, for all Dust Impacts. We have removed these Antenna Length Dependencies, which is why the Amplitude Units are in mV.
Cadence
PT1S
Units
mV
UnitsConversion
1e-3>V
RenderingHints
DisplayType
TimeSeries
AxisLabel
Ch 1 Peak Amp.
ValueFormat
E14.6
ScaleType
LinearScale
ValidMin
-20000.0
ValidMax
20000.0
FillValue
-1.0e+31
Wave
WaveType
PlasmaWaves
Qualifier
Peak
Qualifier
Scalar
WaveQuantity
Intensity
Parameter #7
Name
Cross-Correlation Value, Channel 1
Set
Time series defined by using: EPOCH
ParameterKey
Ch01___cc_value
Description

Cross-Correlation Value, Channel 1

Caveats
The Cross-Correlation Value between the Channel 1 Waveform and the Normalized Median Waveform of a given Morphological Type, e.g., See Malaspina and Wilson, (2016) for Morphological Type Definitions.
Cadence
PT1S
RenderingHints
DisplayType
TimeSeries
AxisLabel
Ch 1 Cross-Corr. Val.
ValueFormat
E14.6
ScaleType
LinearScale
ValidMin
0.0
ValidMax
1.0
FillValue
-1.0e+31
Support
Qualifier
Scalar
SupportQuantity
Other
Parameter #8
Name
Cross-Correlation Threshold Value, Channel 1
Set
Time series defined by using: EPOCH
ParameterKey
Ch01___cc_threshold
Description

Cross-Correlation Threshold Value, Channel 1

Caveats
The Cross-Correlation Threshold Value for the Channel 1 Waveform used. The Overall Cross-Correlation Threshold is 0.8 but Morphological Types C, D, and M are required to exceed 0.9.
Cadence
PT1S
RenderingHints
DisplayType
TimeSeries
AxisLabel
Ch 1 Cross-Corr. Thrsh.
ValueFormat
E14.6
ScaleType
LinearScale
ValidMin
0.0
ValidMax
1.0
FillValue
-1.0e+31
Support
Qualifier
Scalar
SupportQuantity
Other
Parameter #9
Name
Event Selection Threshold Amplitude, Channel 1
Set
Time series defined by using: EPOCH
ParameterKey
MinCh1_threshold
Description

Event Selection Threshold Amplitude, Channel 1

Caveats
The Minimum Channel 1 Absolute Amplitude required for Event Selection. The X-Antenna was first cut on August 3, 2000. It was cut again on September 24, 2002. Currently, the Effective Antenna Lengths used are 41.1 m, 3.79 m, and 2.17 m for the X-Antenna, Y-Antenna, and Z-Antenna, respectively, for all Dust Impacts. We have removed these Antenna Length Dependencies, which is why the Amplitude Units are in mV.
Cadence
PT1S
Units
mV
UnitsConversion
1e-3>V
RenderingHints
DisplayType
TimeSeries
AxisLabel
Ch 1 Min. Thrsh.
ValueFormat
E14.6
ScaleType
LinearScale
ValidMin
0.0
ValidMax
100.0
FillValue
-1.0e+31
Wave
WaveType
PlasmaWaves
Qualifier
Scalar
WaveQuantity
Intensity
Parameter #10
Name
Average Clockwise Angle of the Closest Ex Antenna to the Dust Impact from the Earth-Sun Line
Set
Time series defined by using: EPOCH
ParameterKey
Ch1ImpAnt_E_S_Angle
Description

Average Clockwise Angle of the Closest Ex Antenna to the Dust Impact on the Spacecraft Bus from Earth-Sun Line, roughly GSE +X, Channel 1

Caveats
The Angle accounts for the XY-GSE Displacement of Wind but assumes Earth remains at exactly 1 AU always. The Error introduced by not including the Change of the Earth's Radial Position throughout its annual Orbit is less than ~0.017°. The Error introduced by not including the Change of the Spacecraft's Out-of-Ecliptic Displacement is less than ~0.0018°. The Spacecraft, SC, Spin Axis is aligned within ~0.8° of the South Ecliptic Pole. This varies annually due to the Differences in Torque applied to the SC Bus by Solar Radiation. The Angle can be as low as 0.1°. We define Clockwise (CW) Angles as being less than zero for CW Rotations to remain consistent with Euler Angle Notation. We define CW as viewed from the North Ecliptic Pole looking down upon the XY-GSE Plane. All Angles herein vary from 0° to 360°, Absolute Values, thus a positive Counter-Clockwise Angle corresponds to a Clockwise Angle plus 360° that is greater than 0 °. The Impact Antenna Angle depends upon the closest Impact Antenna, defined by the CDF Variables Ch01___ImpactAntenna and Ch02___ImpactAntenna. An Example Image illustrating the various Angles within these CDF Files can be found in the Malaspina and Wilson, 2016.
Cadence
PT1S
Units
°
UnitsConversion
0.0174532925>rad
CoordinateSystem
CoordinateRepresentation
Spherical
CoordinateSystemName
GSE
RenderingHints
DisplayType
TimeSeries
AxisLabel
Ex Imp. Ant. CW Earth-Sun Angle
ValueFormat
E14.6
ScaleType
LinearScale
ValidMin
-360.0
ValidMax
360.0
FillValue
-1.0e+31
Support
Qualifier
DirectionAngle.AzimuthAngle
SupportQuantity
Positional
Parameter #11
Name
Peak Amplitude, Channel 2
Set
Time series defined by using: EPOCH
ParameterKey
Ch02___Peak_amplitude
Description

Peak Amplitude, Channel 2

Caveats
The Peak Amplitude of the Electric Field Component from the Dust Impact. This is the Peak Amplitude measured during a TDSF Event on both Antenna. This is a Signed Value, that is, Plus, +, or Minus, -. The X-Antenna was first cut on August 3, 2000. It was cut again on September 24, 2002. Currently, the effective Antenna Lengths used are 41.1 m, 3.79 m, and 2.17 m for the X-Antenna, Y-Antenna, and Z-Antenna, respectively, for all Dust Impacts. We have removed these Antenna Length Dependencies, which is why the Amplitude Units are in mV.
Cadence
PT1S
Units
mV
UnitsConversion
1e-3>V
RenderingHints
DisplayType
TimeSeries
AxisLabel
Ch 2 Peak Amp.
ValueFormat
E14.6
ScaleType
LinearScale
ValidMin
-20000.0
ValidMax
20000.0
FillValue
-1.0e+31
Wave
WaveType
PlasmaWaves
Qualifier
Peak
Qualifier
Scalar
WaveQuantity
Intensity
Parameter #12
Name
Cross-Correlation Value, Channel 2
Set
Time series defined by using: EPOCH
ParameterKey
Ch02___cc_value
Description

Cross-Correlation Value, Channel 2

Caveats
The Cross-Correlation Value between the Channel 2 Waveform and the Normalized Median Waveform of a given Morphological Type, e.g., See Malaspina and Wilson, (2016) for Morphological Type Definitions.
Cadence
PT1S
RenderingHints
DisplayType
TimeSeries
AxisLabel
Ch 2 Cross-Corr. Val.
ValueFormat
E14.6
ScaleType
LinearScale
ValidMin
0.0
ValidMax
1.0
FillValue
-1.0e+31
Support
Qualifier
Scalar
SupportQuantity
Other
Parameter #13
Name
Cross-Correlation Threshold Value, Channel 2
Set
Time series defined by using: EPOCH
ParameterKey
Ch02___cc_threshold
Description

Cross-Correlation Threshold Value, Channel 2

Caveats
The Cross-Correlation Threshold Value for the Channel 2 Waveform used. The Overall Cross-Correlation Threshold is 0.8 but Morphological Types C, D, and M are required to exceed 0.9.
Cadence
PT1S
RenderingHints
DisplayType
TimeSeries
AxisLabel
Ch 2 Cross-Corr. Thrsh.
ValueFormat
E14.6
ScaleType
LinearScale
ValidMin
0.0
ValidMax
1.0
FillValue
-1.0e+31
Support
Qualifier
Scalar
SupportQuantity
Other
Parameter #14
Name
Event Selection Threshold Amplitude, Channel 2
Set
Time series defined by using: EPOCH
ParameterKey
MinCh2_threshold
Description

Event Selection Threshold Amplitude, Channel 2

Caveats
The Minimum Channel 2 Absolute Amplitude required for Event Selection. The X-Antenna was first cut on August 3, 2000. It was cut again on September 24, 2002. Currently, the Effective Antenna Lengths used are 41.1 m, 3.79 m, and 2.17 m for the X-Antenna, Y-Antenna, and Z-Antenna, respectively, for all Dust Impacts. We have removed these Antenna Length Dependencies, which is why the Amplitude Units are in mV.
Cadence
PT1S
Units
mV
UnitsConversion
1e-3>V
RenderingHints
DisplayType
TimeSeries
AxisLabel
Ch 2 Min. Thrsh.
ValueFormat
E14.6
ScaleType
LinearScale
ValidMin
0.0
ValidMax
100.0
FillValue
-1.0e+31
Wave
WaveType
PlasmaWaves
Qualifier
Scalar
WaveQuantity
Intensity
Parameter #15
Name
Average Clockwise Angle of the Closest Ey Antenna to the Dust Impact from the Earth-Sun Line
Set
Time series defined by using: EPOCH
ParameterKey
Ch2ImpAnt_E_S_Angle
Description

Average Clockwise Angle of the Closest Ey Antenna to the Dust Impact on the Spacecraft Bus from the Earth-Sun Line, roughly GSE +X, Channel 2

Caveats
The Angle accounts for the XY-GSE Displacement of Wind but assumes Earth remains at exactly 1 AU always. The Error introduced by not including the Change of the Earth's Radial Position throughout its annual Orbit is less than ~0.017°. The Error introduced by not including the Change of the Spacecraft's Out-of-Ecliptic Displacement is less than ~0.0018°. The Spacecraft, SC, Spin Axis is aligned within ~0.8° of the South Ecliptic Pole. This varies annually due to the Differences in Torque applied to the SC Bus by Solar Radiation. The Angle can be as low as 0.1°. We define Clockwise (CW) Angles as being less than zero for CW Rotations to remain consistent with Euler Angle Notation. We define CW as viewed from the North Ecliptic Pole looking down upon the XY-GSE Plane. All Angles herein vary from 0° to 360°, Absolute Values, thus a positive Counter-Clockwise Angle corresponds to a Clockwise Angle plus 360° that is greater than 0 °. The Impact Antenna Angle depends upon the closest Impact Antenna, defined by the CDF Variables Ch01___ImpactAntenna and Ch02___ImpactAntenna. An Example Image illustrating the various Angles within these CDF Files can be found in the Malaspina and Wilson, 2016.
Cadence
PT1S
Units
°
UnitsConversion
0.0174532925>rad
CoordinateSystem
CoordinateRepresentation
Spherical
CoordinateSystemName
GSE
RenderingHints
DisplayType
TimeSeries
AxisLabel
Ey Imp. Ant. CW Earth-Sun Angle
ValueFormat
E14.6
ScaleType
LinearScale
ValidMin
-360.0
ValidMax
360.0
FillValue
-1.0e+31
Support
Qualifier
Average
Qualifier
DirectionAngle.AzimuthAngle
SupportQuantity
Positional
Parameter #16
Name
Average Clockwise Angle of +Ex Antenna from the Spacecraft-Sun Line
Set
Time series defined by using: EPOCH
ParameterKey
Pos_Ax_SCS_Angle
Description

Average Clockwise Angle of +Ex Antenna from the Spacecraft-Sun Line

Caveats
The Angle accounts for the XY-GSE Displacement of Wind but assumes Earth remains at exactly 1 AU always. The Error introduced by not including the Change of the Earth's Radial Position throughout its annual Orbit is less than ~0.017°. The Error introduced by not including the Change of the Spacecraft's Out-of-Ecliptic Displacement is less than ~0.0018°. The Spacecraft, SC, Spin Axis is aligned within ~0.8° of the South Ecliptic Pole. This varies annually due to the Differences in Torque applied to the SC Bus by Solar Radiation. The Angle can be as low as 0.1°. We define Clockwise (CW) Angles as being less than zero for CW Rotations to remain consistent with Euler Angle Notation. We define CW as viewed from the North Ecliptic Pole looking down upon the XY-GSE Plane. All Angles herein vary from 0° to 360°, Absolute Values, thus a positive Counter-Clockwise Angle corresponds to a Clockwise Angle plus 360° that is greater than 0 °. The Impact Antenna Angle depends upon the closest Impact Antenna, defined by the CDF Variables Ch01___ImpactAntenna and Ch02___ImpactAntenna. An Example Image illustrating the various Angles within these CDF Files can be found in the Malaspina and Wilson, 2016.
Cadence
PT1S
Units
°
UnitsConversion
0.0174532925>rad
CoordinateSystem
CoordinateRepresentation
Spherical
CoordinateSystemName
HG
RenderingHints
DisplayType
TimeSeries
AxisLabel
+Ex CW SC-Sun Angle
ValueFormat
E14.6
ScaleType
LinearScale
ValidMin
-360.0
ValidMax
360.0
FillValue
-1.0e+31
Support
Qualifier
Average
Qualifier
DirectionAngle.AzimuthAngle
SupportQuantity
Positional
Parameter #17
Name
Average Clockwise Angle of +Ex Antenna from the Earth-Sun Line
Set
Time series defined by using: EPOCH
ParameterKey
Pos_Ax_E_S_Angle
Description

Average Clockwise Angle of +Ex Antenna from the Earth-Sun Line, roughly GSE +X

Caveats
The Angle accounts for the XY-GSE Displacement of Wind but assumes Earth remains at exactly 1 AU always. The Error introduced by not including the Change of the Earth's Radial Position throughout its annual Orbit is less than ~0.017°. The Error introduced by not including the Change of the Spacecraft's Out-of-Ecliptic Displacement is less than ~0.0018°. The Spacecraft, SC, Spin Axis is aligned within ~0.8° of the South Ecliptic Pole. This varies annually due to the Differences in Torque applied to the SC Bus by Solar Radiation. The Angle can be as low as 0.1°. We define Clockwise (CW) Angles as being less than zero for CW Rotations to remain consistent with Euler Angle Notation. We define CW as viewed from the North Ecliptic Pole looking down upon the XY-GSE Plane. All Angles herein vary from 0° to 360°, Absolute Values, thus a positive Counter-Clockwise Angle corresponds to a Clockwise Angle plus 360° that is greater than 0 °. The Impact Antenna Angle depends upon the closest Impact Antenna, defined by the CDF Variables Ch01___ImpactAntenna and Ch02___ImpactAntenna. An Example Image illustrating the various Angles within these CDF Files can be found in the Malaspina and Wilson, 2016.
Cadence
PT1S
Units
°
UnitsConversion
0.0174532925>rad
CoordinateSystem
CoordinateRepresentation
Spherical
CoordinateSystemName
GSE
RenderingHints
DisplayType
TimeSeries
AxisLabel
+Ex CW Earth-Sun Angle
ValueFormat
E14.6
ScaleType
LinearScale
ValidMin
-360.0
ValidMax
360.0
FillValue
-1.0e+31
Support
Qualifier
Average
Qualifier
DirectionAngle.AzimuthAngle
SupportQuantity
Positional
Parameter #18
Name
Average Clockwise Angle of +Ey Antenna from the Earth-Sun Line
Set
Time series defined by using: EPOCH
ParameterKey
Pos_Ay_E_S_Angle
Description

Average Clockwise Angle of +Ey Antenna from the Earth-Sun Line, roughly GSE +X

Caveats
The Angle accounts for the XY-GSE Displacement of Wind but assumes Earth remains at exactly 1 AU always. The Error introduced by not including the Change of the Earth's Radial Position throughout its annual Orbit is less than ~0.017°. The Error introduced by not including the Change of the Spacecraft's Out-of-Ecliptic Displacement is less than ~0.0018°. The Spacecraft, SC, Spin Axis is aligned within ~0.8° of the South Ecliptic Pole. This varies annually due to the Differences in Torque applied to the SC Bus by Solar Radiation. The Angle can be as low as 0.1°. We define Clockwise (CW) Angles as being less than zero for CW Rotations to remain consistent with Euler Angle Notation. We define CW as viewed from the North Ecliptic Pole looking down upon the XY-GSE Plane. All Angles herein vary from 0° to 360°, Absolute Values, thus a positive Counter-Clockwise Angle corresponds to a Clockwise Angle plus 360° that is greater than 0 °. The Impact Antenna Angle depends upon the closest Impact Antenna, defined by the CDF Variables Ch01___ImpactAntenna and Ch02___ImpactAntenna. An Example Image illustrating the various Angles within these CDF Files can be found in the Malaspina and Wilson, 2016.
Cadence
PT1S
Units
°
UnitsConversion
0.0174532925>rad
CoordinateSystem
CoordinateRepresentation
Spherical
CoordinateSystemName
GSE
RenderingHints
DisplayType
TimeSeries
AxisLabel
+Ey CW Earth-Sun Angle
ValueFormat
E14.6
ScaleType
LinearScale
ValidMin
-360.0
ValidMax
360.0
FillValue
-1.0e+31
Support
Qualifier
Average
Qualifier
DirectionAngle.AzimuthAngle
SupportQuantity
Positional
Parameter #19
Name
Average Clockwise Angle of +Ex Antenna from the Earth-Sun Line, Uncertainty
Set
Time series defined by using: EPOCH
ParameterKey
Pos_Ax_E_S_Delta_Angle
Description

Average Clockwise Angle of +Ex Antenna from the Earth-Sun Line, roughly GSE +X, Uncertainty

Caveats
The Angle accounts for the XY-GSE Displacement of Wind but assumes Earth remains at exactly 1 AU always. The Error introduced by not including the Change of the Earth's Radial Position throughout its annual Orbit is less than ~0.017°. The Error introduced by not including the Change of the Spacecraft's Out-of-Ecliptic Displacement is less than ~0.0018°. The Spacecraft, SC, Spin Axis is aligned within ~0.8° of the South Ecliptic Pole. This varies annually due to the Differences in Torque applied to the SC Bus by Solar Radiation. The Angle can be as low as 0.1°. We define Clockwise (CW) Angles as being less than zero for CW Rotations to remain consistent with Euler Angle Notation. We define CW as viewed from the North Ecliptic Pole looking down upon the XY-GSE Plane. All Angles herein vary from 0° to 360°, Absolute Values, thus a positive Counter-Clockwise Angle corresponds to a Clockwise Angle plus 360° that is greater than 0 °. The Impact Antenna Angle depends upon the closest Impact Antenna, defined by the CDF Variables Ch01___ImpactAntenna and Ch02___ImpactAntenna. An Example Image illustrating the various Angles within these CDF Files can be found in the Malaspina and Wilson, 2016.
Cadence
PT1S
Units
°
UnitsConversion
0.0174532925>rad
CoordinateSystem
CoordinateRepresentation
Spherical
CoordinateSystemName
GSE
RenderingHints
DisplayType
TimeSeries
AxisLabel
Delta Pos_Ax_E_S_Angle
ValueFormat
E14.6
ScaleType
LinearScale
ValidMin
0.0
ValidMax
360.0
FillValue
-1.0e+31
Support
Qualifier
Average
Qualifier
DirectionAngle.AzimuthAngle
Qualifier
Uncertainty
SupportQuantity
Positional
Parameter #20
Name
Average Clockwise Angle of the E[x,y] Impact Antenna from the Earth-Sun Angle, Uncertainty
Set
Time series defined by using: EPOCH
ParameterKey
ImpAnt_E_S_Delta_Angle
Description

Average Clockwise Angle of the E[x,y] Impact Antenna from the Earth-Sun Angle, roughly GSE +X, Uncertainty

Caveats
The Impact Angle Uncertainties are mostly controlled by the Quadrant or Hemisphere in which the Dust Impact occurred. This is true for the Ch1ImpAnt_E_S_Angle and Ch2ImpAnt_E_S_Angle. This is roughly ±45°, i.e., Quadrant, for all Events. For the other Sun Angles, that is, Pos_Ax_SCS_Angle, Pos_Ax_E_S_Angle, and Pos_Ay_E_S_Angle, the Uncertainty is controlled by the Spin Rate of the Spacecraft as determined by Event Duration and Angle subtended during an Event multiplied by the TDSF Event Duration plus the DPU Clock Latency Uncertainty, i.e., about 10.6 ms. Thus, this Uncertainty is currently less than 13° for the Worst Case Scenario with Fastest Spin Rate and Slowest Sampling Rate. In the Best Case Scenario and for most Events, the Uncertainties drop to ~3°.
Cadence
PT1S
Units
°
UnitsConversion
0.0174532925>rad
CoordinateSystem
CoordinateRepresentation
Spherical
CoordinateSystemName
GSE
RenderingHints
DisplayType
TimeSeries
AxisLabel
Delta ImpAnt_E_S_Angle
ValueFormat
E14.6
ScaleType
LinearScale
ValidMin
0.0
ValidMax
360.0
FillValue
-1.0e+31
Support
Qualifier
Average
Qualifier
DirectionAngle.AzimuthAngle
Qualifier
Uncertainty
SupportQuantity
Positional